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Inside Childhood Cancer: Excerpts from the book Chronicling Childhood Cancer

TrishaPaulBookCoverby Trisha Paul, Aspiring Pediatric Oncologist

A Collection of Personal Stories by Children and Teens with Cancer

 

In honor of Childhood Cancer Awareness Month this September, the book  Chronicling Childhood Cancer: A Collection of Personal Stories by Children and Teens with Cancer has been published by Michigan Publishing at the University of Michigan. In this narrative collection, ten children and teens from C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital use their own words and colorful drawings to share their personal experiences with cancer.

This diverse collection of patient stories provides insight into the unique lives of these individuals; some are recently diagnosed and undergoing treatment for cancer while others are in remission or have relapsed. These children and teens are honest and perceptive, their stories told with heartfelt emotion.  The following excerpts are found in the book.

In a quiet, isolated corner of the waiting room, as he told me about his experiences with cancer, Jacob started to draw:

TrishaPaulJacob

Ruben chose to have a conversation with me. Then, he took the blank storybook home to work on. This is what he wrote:

TrishaPaulRuben1

TrishaPaulRuben2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

All of the proceeds received by the University of Michigan Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology for this book will be donated: 50% to the Block Out Cancer campaign for pediatric cancer research at the University of Michigan and 50% to the Child and Family Life Program at the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital.

 

The Power of Presence: Listening to Children and Teens with Cancer

Why We Need More Stories by Children and Teens with Cancer

 


 

 

 

TrishaPaulHoldingBookTrisha Paul is a first year medical student at the University of  Michigan Medical School. Trisha graduated from the University of  Michigan with a B.S. in English with Honors along with minors in
Biochemistry and Medical Anthropology. Largely because of her volunteer experiences at C.S. Mott Childrens Hospital, Trisha aspires to become a pediatric oncologist.

 

 

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2 Responses to Inside Childhood Cancer: Excerpts from the book Chronicling Childhood Cancer

  1. Pingback: Why We Need More Stories by Children and Teens with Cancer | Cancer Knowledge Network

  2. Lisa M. Nave says:

    Mother of 12yr old Gabrielle, soon to be 13 on Nov 11th. Father passed away May 21, 2011. She fell in PE on Nov 7, 2012. Misdiagnosed & sent to PT. Ankle the size of her calf on 2nd day. Demanded 2nd opinion. Found Ewing’s Sarcoma 11/22. We all have 23 chromosomes. She was having a “huge growth spurt” at the time of her fall, her #11 & #22 morphed into a “beast” & rubbed on vigorously for almost 6 weeks in PT! Referred to CHNOLA, found Dr Stephen Heinrich, & stayed because of him. She responded well to chemo. Ironically, surgery rescheduled to May 21, 2013; bone salvage & fused ankle, but he saved her foot! I got PTSD & had no funding available to help us, with Ewing’s Sarcoma being “so rare”, supposedly! So many have NO CLUE exactly HOW our lives are FOREVER changed from what our children go through. I still cry over children we grew to love, who lost their battles. Gabrielle kept her sense of humor, even when “I” lost mine. I told each new patient that God chose “us”, as parents; & Jesus chose our children, to experience just a bit of HIS pain, in order to be closer to HIM! She’s now 8 months out, N.E.D., PRAISE GOD, but starting completely over & unforeseen “other” medical issues are presenting themselves. One step forward, three steps back.

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