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Tag Archives: Palliative care

Aid-in-Dying: I Haven’t Given Up, I Never Will

SusanRahnby Susan Rahn, Living with Cancer

 

Recently, Interfaith Impact of NY, a state wide coalition of congregations and individuals, whose mission is to work for the common good, held a panel discussion regarding Aid-in-Dying.

 

Panelists included: Corinne Carey, NY Director of Compassion & Choices, Timothy Quill, MD, Director of Palliative Care within the Department of Medicine at the University of Rochester at Strong Hospital, Diane Coleman, President & CEO of Not Dead Yet – a national disability rights group and James Hanson, President of Patients Rights Action Fund.

 

These are my personal comments on the panel discussion.

 

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Reflections of an Oncology Nurse on Physician Assisted Death in Canada

JenniferStephensby Jennifer M.L. Stephens, RN, MA, PhD(c), RN, OCN

 

The workshop on physician-assisted suicide (PAD) at the October 2015 Canadian Association of Oncology Nurses (CANO/ACIO) drew enough oncology nurses to fill the room far beyond capacity. Following the 2015 decision of the Supreme Court of Canada in Carter v. Canada to allow PAD, professional nursing organizations including CANO/ACIO, the Canadian Nursing Association (CNA), provincial licensing bodies, and health care employers are scrambling to interpret what PAD means to Canadian nursing and nurses.

 

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PAD: Physician Assisted Death

paliative_care_tree

There has been considerable buzz around the issue of assisted death in Canada – and around the world – lately.  CKN will be publishing a new series surrounding this issue.  Stay tuned as we hear different perspectives from both professionals and patients in the coming weeks.

ALS sufferer first Canadian to receive judge’s approval for assisted death
SEAN FINE AND ELIZABETH CHURCH
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Mar. 01, 2016

 

Join the heated discussion in the Current Oncology journal about assisted death:

Pereira’s attack on legalizing euthanasia or assisted suicide: smoke and mirrors

Casting stones and casting aspersions: let’s not lose sight of the main issues in the euthanasia debate

Assisted death and the slippery slope—finding clarity amid advocacy, convergence, and complexity

 


Pediatric Palliative Care: A Multidisciplinary Approach

TrishaPaulby Trisha Paul, CKN Advisory Board Member, Childhood Cancer Narratives

 

I have to admit—one of the first reasons that palliative care first piqued my interest was because I wanted to learn more about death. But as I’ve delved deeper into palliative care, I’ve come to realize just how much more comprehensive it is. While increasing access to hospice care is a component of what palliative care provides, palliative care does so much more for patients and families.

 

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Discovering a Passion for Pediatric Palliative Care

TrishaPaulby Trisha Paul, CKN Advisory Board Member, Childhood Cancer Narratives

 

As someone who loves spending time with kids, I was thrilled when I was placed to volunteer on the 7th floor pediatric oncology inpatient playroom at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital. Although I was just in high school, I had an early interest in becoming a pediatrician, and Mott seemed like the perfect place for me to learn more.

 

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End Stage Chemotherapy: A physician’s perspective

Paul Wheatley-Priceby Paul Wheatley-Price BSc, MBChB, MRCP (UK), MD
Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Division of Medical Oncology, Chair of Medical Advisory Committee, Lung Cancer Canada

 

One of the hardest discussions between an oncologist and their patient occurs at the time of transition from active anti-cancer therapy to best supportive care alone. This consultation has been reported as one of the most stressful faced by the physician, and of course is a nodal event for the patient. It is also clear that patients want their physicians to be honest, up to date and compassionate in these meetings.

 

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